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Trailhead

After reaching Mount Desert Island on ME Route 3, stay to the right to follow ME Route 102 toward the towns of Somesville and Southwest Harbor. At the stoplight, follow ME Route 198 towards Northeast Harbor.

Alternatively, from Bar Harbor, follow ME Route 233 to reach ME Route 198. Park at the trailhead along the highway in a parking area just North of Upper Hadlock Pond.

Description

The Norumbega Loop begins with a very steep ascent on granite boulders up Goat Trail to reach the summit of Norumbega Mountain at 852 feet. From there the trail descends gradually along a ridge with some views of Somes Sound. On reaching Lower Hadlock Pond, the loop continues left on the Hadlock Pond Trail along the shore of the pond. Portions of this trail are on boardwalk because of boggy areas when the trail is wet. At the north end of Hadlock pond, in wet weather the hiker may be rewarded with a waterfall as the water flows from Upper Hadlock to Lower Hadlock Pond.

There is a junction just past the pond. At this point, the Norumbega Connector trail provides views of Upper Hadlock Pond and leads back to the parking area.

Other Information

Dogs must be on a six foot leash. The first ascent is very steep and may not be suitable for dogs.

Geocaching is prohibited within Acadia National Park; however, the park does sponsor an EarthCache Program for those seeking a virtual treasure hunt!

Trail Manager

Visit Acadia National Park online for more information or contact:

National Park Service, Acadia National Park
PO Box 177
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
Phone: (207) 288-3338
acadia_information@nps.gov

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Nearby Geocaches

Geocaching.com

Check for nearby geocaches to Acadia National Park - Norumbega Mountain Loop.

Leave No Trace Principle

Leave What You Find

Avoid the introduction or transport of non-native species. Use local firewood from within 50 miles and clean, drain, and dry water equipment when moving between water bodies.