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Trailhead

From North: From the intersection of US Route 1 and ME Route 189 in Whiting, take ME Route 189 to ME Route 191. Turn right and travel 10 miles to the parking area and trailhead on the left of the road (marked by a blue/white sign). 

From South: From the intersection of US Route 1 and ME Route 191 in East Machias, turn right on ME Route 191 and travel 16.9 miles to the parking area/trailhead on right of the road (marked by a blue/white sign). 

Description

The coastal portion of the property has hiking trips from 3-10 miles. Wear sturdy footwear and take care near cliffs and on boardwalks, particularly in damp and slippery conditions. The estimated trail times listed below assume a leisurely pace in good conditions with brief stops. 

Coastal Trail to Ocean (2.8-mile roundtrip, allow 2 hours): This is a forested path that runs through a cedar swamp and maritime spruce-fir forest before reaching a promontory overlooking the ocean. It is the easiest trail segment offering a visitors’ first spectacular view of the ocean from the high cliffs that are prominent along this property. 

Black Point Brook Loop (5.5-mile roundtrip, allow 4-5 hours): Wooded trails and rocky cliffside hiking lead to a small cobble beach at Black Point Cove (accessible via a log ladder). The return route, via the Inland Trail, is somewhat rocky but over fairly gentle terrain and through an Acadian forest. 

Fairy Head Loop (9.2-mile roundtrip, allow 6-7 hours): This trail provides the most extensive shorefront hiking with 3.8 miles that skirt the shore. At Fairy Head, the trail turns inland through open meadows and forest, passing by a freshwater grass marsh and a large beaver pond.

Other Information

Cutler Coast Public Reserve Land is on what is known as the Bold Coast. For more information about the unique geology of the area and features along the trail, check out the Bold Coast on Maine Geological Survey's website.

The trail system follows many clifftops presenting hazards to those who follow too closely especially in wet or foggy conditions. Be prepared for drastic weather changes and be aware that there is very spotty cell coverage along the trails.

On the forested northern portion of the property, across ME Route 191, there are 19.5 miles of shared-use roads and designated ATV trails, many of them maintained by the East Stream Trail Riders ATV Club. A portion of this system passes through the Ecological Reserve: please remain on the trail to protect the Reserve grasslands and fragile peatbog ecosystems.

Cobscook Trails Project: The trails on Cutler Coast Public Reserved Land are part of a larger network of hiking trails in known as Cobscook Trails. Cobscook Trails is a cooperative project of conservation landowners and community partners that seeks to expand opportunities for nature-based recreation and tourism in eastern Washington County. The group produces "Cobscook Trails: A Guide to Walking Opportunities around Cobscook Bay and Bold Coast Region", a 55 page booklet describing walks on 19 area properties. Find more information about Cobscook Trails, including how to purchase the guidebook, visit: The Cobscook Trails Project.

Natural Heritage HikesNatural Heritage Hikes is a project of the Maine Natural Areas Program in partnership with Maine Trail FinderView the Cutler Coast - Black Point Loop Trail Natural Heritage Hike Guide.

LMF Logo

This trail passes through a property that was acquired in part with funds from the Land for Maine’s Future program. For more information about the LMF program and the places it has helped to protect, please visit the LMF webpage.

Trail Manager

Visit the Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands online for more information and a printable map or contact:

Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands, Eastern Public Lands Office
106 Hogan Road, Suite 5
Bangor, ME 04401
Phone: (207) 941-4412

Comments

slhoward44 March 31, 2017, 2:36 pm EDT

My husband and I hiked the half loop in late August 2016 and stayed overnight at tent site 5. I have heard reviews before about how you will not encounter many other hikers, and this was not at all true when we went. We arrived at the trailhead at 11am on a Thursday and according to the log, there were already 4 groups camping that night. We crossed our fingers and took the inland trail to the cutoff and were delighted to find that first site vacant. We set up a tent and not 20 minutes later, a couple came by hoping the site was empty. This was repeated 6 times over the next several hours! And that's not counting the day hikers or any that came by while we were on the beach. The last couple just set up their tent down the hill from our site, which didn't offer us much privacy, but they were quiet enough. This is a gorgeous place, the weather was perfect and we slept well. The only real warning I have other than the throngs of people passing your campsite is the mosquitos. They were absolutely vicious. We covered ourselves in 100% DEET and still suffered. Being right on the cliffs or inside your zippered tent is the only relief. The next day, we took the coastal trail back to the car and it was absolutely breathtaking. I hope to do the whole 10 miles someday, but I will make sure I'm there nice and early.

ynotsilva September 20, 2016, 10:29 am EDT

I hiked the whole trail on 8/11/16. It was one of the best hikes in my life. Originally I planed to do the 5 mile loop, but it was a foggy morning so i decided to keep to the woods/swamp/pond and then hit the ocean at Fairy Head. The fog was still present when i got to the ocean, but it moved in and out and eventually I was able to see Grand Manan. The cliffs are incredible and the mix of salt air with the pine trees was just wonderful. I passed three primitive campsites and wished i had a tent to spend the night. Sunrise must be amazing. I plan on returning next August to camp overnight. In the end I did the 10 miles in about 7 hours

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